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I think I have one…where is it?

Here at 924S944.com, we put in a computerized system to catalog and track parts, hardware and even cars, designed by Liquid Genius.  I enter a part into the system, then print a sticker with the part description and, more importantly, a QR Code.  Using my iPhone camera, I can scan the code to get information on that part, such as where it came from, condition, and value.

rear caliper labelThe system also allows me to search the database for a part.  Since the software is cloud-based, I can access the database from anywhere with internet access – even my phone or iPad.  Not only will it find out whether I have the part in question, but it also provides the full description, the value in case I want to sell it on, and where to find it in the shop.  Yes – which shelf and which bin it is located.

Here is a great example.  I was working on my 924 ITB car the other day putting the header on the engine, in the car.  I needed to replace three of the studs in the head – three of them go buggered up, and I wanted clean threads.  I remembered that I had another set of studs, nuts and washers that I got some time ago from Lindsey Racing…where were they?  To the computer, quick search, and found out that they were in Bin A1A – that is Shelf Unit A, Shelf 1, Bin A.  I pulled that bin, and there was the package from Lindsey!  Less than a minute, in my hands and on with the job at hand.

In the past, searching for that elusive package of eight studs, eight washers and eight copper nuts would have eaten up a lot of time, and maybe even resulted in a trip to the local Ace Hardware to buy some studs.  But not this time.

It is taking a lot of time to catalog the hundreds and hundreds of parts that I have collected over the years, but progress is steady.  I have cataloged over three hundred so far, including labeling each bin with a QR code – scan the code and get a complete list of the parts in that bin.  I can also scan the code for a shelf unit and get a complete list of the bins and parts in that shelf unit.  If I want to reorganize, I simply change the location of the part in the database.

Image result for cant find itThat brings up another cool benefit of this system.  I can move parts to a particular engine or particular car.  Let’s say that I have a rebuilt head in the system with information on when and who did the reconditioning, what was done, what valves, springs, etc. are there, and other pertinent information.  I then install that head on an engine that I am rebuilding, which is also in the system.  In the system, I move the location of the head to the engine, and when I install the engine in a car, I move the location of the engine from the shop floor to that particular car.  Later, when I scan the code for the car, I have a complete list of what was installed, when, etc.  Instant history.

It is not a perfect system as it is adapted from other purposes, but it is many steps forward for me and my operations.  As we learn more and refine it more, it will get more and more useful.

I love technology.

Kevin Duffy, Author and Chief Geek View All

Kevin Duffy is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Daytona State College in Florida and a dedicated car guy. He divides his time between teaching criminal justice topics in the online environment and working on/driving cars, particularly Porsches. Kevin is one of the principals in InspiringLifeOver50.com.

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